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Track The Tropics has been the #1 source to track the tropics 24/7 since 2013! The main goal of the site is to bring all of the important links and graphics to ONE PLACE so you can keep up to date on any threats to land during the Atlantic Hurricane Season! Hurricane Season 2021 in the Atlantic starts on June 1st and ends on November 30th. Love Spaghetti Models? Well you've come to the right place!! Remember when you're preparing for a storm: Run from the water; hide from the wind!
The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season had a record breaking 30 named storms this season, 13 developed into hurricanes, and six further intensified into major hurricanes!!!!! WHAT A SEASON #2020!!!!
Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale
Category Wind Speed Storm Surge
  mph ft
5 ≥157 >18
4 130–156 13–18
3 111–129 9–12
2 96–110 6–8
1 74–95 4–5
Additional Classifications
Tropical Storm 39–73 0–3
Tropical Depression 0–38 0
The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale is a classification used for most Western Hemisphere tropical cyclones that exceed the intensities of "tropical depressions" and "tropical storms", and thereby become hurricanes. Source: Intellicast

Hurricane Season 101

The official Atlantic Basin Hurricane Season runs from June 1st to November 30th. A tropical cyclone is a warm-core, low pressure system without any “front” attached. It develops over tropical or subtropical waters, and has an organized circulation. Depending upon location, tropical cyclones have different names around the world. The Tropical Cyclones we track in the Atlantic basin are called Tropical Depressions, Tropical Storms and Hurricanes! Atlantic Basin Tropical Cyclones are classified as follows: Tropical Depression: Organized system of clouds and thunderstorms with defined surface circulation and max sustained winds of 38 mph or less. Tropical Storm: Organized system of strong thunderstorms with a defined surface circulation and maximum sustained winds of 39-73 mph. Hurricane: Intense tropical weather system of strong thunderstorms with a well-defined surface circulation. A Hurricane has max sustained winds of 74 mph or higher!

The difference between Tropical Storm and Hurricane Watches, Warnings, Advisories and Outlooks

Warnings:Listen closely to instructions from local officials on TV, radio, cell phones or other computers for instructions from local officials.Evacuate immediately if told to do so.
  • Storm Surge Warning: There is a danger of life-threatening inundation from rising water moving inland from the shoreline somewhere within the specified area. This is generally within 36 hours. If you are under a storm surge warning, check for evacuation orders from your local officials.
  • Hurricane Warning: Hurricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or greater) are expected somewhere within the specified area. NHC issues a hurricane warning 36 hours in advance of tropical storm-force winds to give you time to complete your preparations. All preparations should be complete. Evacuate immediately if so ordered.
  • Tropical Storm Warning: Tropical storm conditions (sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are expected within your area within 36 hours.
  • Extreme Wind Warning: Extreme sustained winds of a major hurricane (115 mph or greater), usually associated with the eyewall, are expected to begin within an hour. Take immediate shelter in the interior portion of a well-built structure.
Please note that hurricane and tropical storm watches and warnings for winds on land as well as storm surge watches and warnings can be issued for storms that the NWS believes will become tropical cyclones but have not yet attained all of the characteristics of a tropical cyclone (i.e., a closed low-level circulation, sustained thunderstorm activity, etc.). In these cases, the forecast conditions on land warrant alerting the public. These storms are referred to as “potential tropical cyclones” by the NWS. Hurricane, tropical storm, and storm surge watches and warnings can also be issued for storms that have lost some or all of their tropical cyclone characteristics, but continue to produce dangerous conditions. These storms are called “post-tropical cyclones” by the NWS. Watches: Listen closely to instructions from local officials on TV, radio, cell phones or other computers for instructions from local officials. Evacuate if told to do so.
  • Storm Surge Watch: Storm here is a possibility of life-threatening inundation from rising water moving inland from the shoreline somewhere within the specified area, generally within 48 hours. If you are under a storm surge watch, check for evacuation orders from your local officials.
  • Hurricane Watch: Huriricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or greater) are possible within your area. Because it may not be safe to prepare for a hurricane once winds reach tropical storm force, The NHC issues hurricane watches 48 hours before it anticipates tropical storm-force winds.
  • Tropical Storm Watch: Tropical storm conditions (sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are possible within the specified area within 48 hours.
Advisories:
  • Tropical Cyclone Public Advisory:The Tropical Cyclone Public Advisory contains a list of all current coastal watches and warnings associated with an ongoing or potential tropical cyclone, a post-tropical cyclone, or a subtropical cyclone. It also provides the cyclone position, maximum sustained winds, current motion, and a description of the hazards associated with the storm.
  • Tropical Cyclone Track Forecast Cone:This graphic shows areas under tropical storm and hurricane watches and warnings, the current position of the center of the storm, and its predicted track. Forecast uncertainty is conveyed on the graphic by a “cone” (white and stippled areas) drawn such that the center of the storm will remain within the cone about 60 to 70 percent of the time. Remember, the effects of a tropical cyclone can span hundreds of miles. Areas well outside of the cone often experience hazards such as tornadoes or inland flooding from heavy rain.
Outlooks:
  • Tropical Weather Outlook:The Tropical Weather Outlook is a discussion of significant areas of disturbed weather and their potential for development during the next 5 days. The Outlook includes a categorical forecast of the probability of tropical cyclone formation during the first 48 hours and during the entire 5-day forecast period. You can also find graphical versions of the 2-day and 5-day Outlook here
Be sure to read up on tons of more information on Hurricane knowledge, preparedness, statistics and history under the menu on the left hand side of the page! Here are your 2020 Hurricane Season Names: Arthur, Bertha, Cristobal, Dolly, Edouard, Fay, Gonzalo, Hanna, Isaias, Josephine ,Kyle, Laura, Marco, Nana, Omar, Paulette, Rene, Sally, Teddy, Vicky and Wilfred!!!

CONUS Hurricane Strikes

1950-2017
[Map of 1950-2017 CONUS Hurricane Strikes]
Total Hurricane Strikes 1900-2010 Total Hurricane Strikes 1900-2010 Total MAJOR Hurricane Strikes 1900-2010 Total Major Hurricane Strikes 1900-2010 Western Gulf Hurricane Strikes Western Gulf Hurricane Strikes Western Gulf MAJOR Hurricane Strikes Western Gulf Major Hurricane Strikes Eastern Gulf Hurricane Strikes Eastern Gulf Hurricane Strikes Eastern Gulf MAJOR Hurricane Strikes Eastern Gulf Major Hurricane Strikes SE Coast Hurricane Strikes SE Coast Hurricane Strikes SE Coast MAJOR Hurricane Strikes SE Coast Major Hurricane Strikes NE Coast Hurricane Strikes NE Coast Hurricane Strikes NE Coast MAJOR Hurricane Strikes NE Coast Major Hurricane Strikes

2019 Hurricane Season Storms

The 2019 Hurricane Season as far as numbers go was an active above average one. It was marked by tropical activity that churned busily from mid-August through October. The season produced 18 named storms, including six hurricanes of which three were “major” (Category 3, 4 or 5). NOAA’s outlook called for 10-17 named storms, 5-9 hurricanes and 2-4 major hurricanes, and accurately predicted the overall activity of the season. You can find the other Season predictions HERE.Atlantic TAFB TWS 2019

Check out a 60 second satellite loop video of the Season…

Subtropical Storm ANDREA
Duration May 20 – May 21 2019
Peak intensity 40 mph (65 km/h) (1-min)
1006 mbar (hPa) WIKI

Hurricane BARRY
Duration July 11 – July 16 2019
Peak intensity 75 mph (120 km/h) (1-min)
993 mbar (hPa) WIKI

Tropical Depression THREE
Duration July 22 – July 23 2019
Peak intensity 35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min)
1013 mbar (hPa) WIKI

Tropical Storm CHANTAL
Duration August 20 – August 23 2019
Peak intensity 40 mph (65 km/h) (1-min)
1007 mbar (hPa) WIKI

MAJOR Hurricane DORIAN (Category 5)
Duration August 24 – September 10 2019
Peak intensity 185 mph (295 km/h) (1-min) 
910 mbar (hPa) WIKI

Tropical Storm ERIN
Duration August 26 – August 29 2019
Peak intensity 40 mph (65 km/h) (1-min)
1002 mbar (hPa) WIKI

Tropical Storm FERNAND
Duration September 3 – September 5 2019
Peak intensity 50 mph (85 km/h) (1-min)
1000 mbar (hPa) WIKI

Tropical Storm GABRIELLE
Duration September 3 – September 10 2019
Peak intensity 65 mph (100 km/h) (1-min)
1005 mbar (hPa) WIKI

MAJOR Hurricane HUMBERTO (Category 3)
Duration September 13 – September 20 2019
Peak intensity 125 mph (205 km/h) (1-min)
950 mbar (hPa) WIKI

Tropical Storm IMELDA
Duration September 17 – September 21 2019
Peak intensity 45 mph (75 km/h) (1-min)
1003 mbar (hPa) WIKI

Hurricane JERRY
Duration September 17 – September 24 2019
Peak intensity 60 mph (95 km/h) (1-min)
976 mbar (hPa) WIKI

Tropical Storm KAREN
Duration September 22 – September 27 2019
Peak intensity 45 mph (75 km/h) (1-min)
1003 mbar (hPa) WIKI

MAJOR Hurricane LORENZO (Category 5)
Duration September 23 – October 4 2019
Peak intensity 160 mph (260 km/h) (1-min)
925 mbar (hPa) WIKI

Tropical Storm MELISSA
Duration October 11 – October 14 2019
Peak intensity 65 mph (100 km/h) (1-min)
994 mbar (hPa) WIKI

Tropical Depression FIFTEEN
Duration October 14 – October 16 2019
Peak intensity 35 mph (55 km/h) (1-min)
1006 mbar (hPa) WIKI

Tropical Storm NESTOR
Duration October 18 – October 21 2019
Peak intensity 60 mph (95 km/h) (1-min)
996 mbar (hPa) WIKI

Tropical Storm OLGA
Duration October 25 – October 28 2019
Peak intensity 45 mph (75 km/h) (1-min)
998 mbar (hPa) WIKI

Hurricane  PABLO
Duration October 25 – October 28 2019
Peak intensity 80 mph (130 km/h) (1-min)
997 mbar (hPa) WIKI

Subtropical Storm REBEKAH
Duration October 30 – November 1 2019
Peak intensity 50 mph (85 km/h) (1-min)
982 mbar (hPa) WIKI

Tropical Storm SEBASTIEN
Duration November 19 – November 24 2019
Peak intensity 70 mph (110 km/h) (1-min)
991 mbar (hPa) WIKI

 

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